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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Archived Storm Damage Blog Posts

Preparing for a Flood

9/10/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Preparing for a Flood Flooding at our office after Hurricane Harvey.
  • Know the types of flood risk in your area. Visit FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center for more information
  • Sign up for your community’s warning system. The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio also provide emergency alerts.
  • If flash flooding is a risk in your location, then monitor potential signs, such as heavy rains.
  • Learn and Practice evacuation routes, shelter plans, and flash flood response.
  • Gather supplies in case you have to leave immediately, or if services are cut off. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Don’t forget the needs of your pets as well. Obtain extra batteries and charging devices for phones and other critical equipment.
  • Purchase or renew a flood insurance policy. It typically takes up to 30 days for a policy to go into effect and can protect the life you’ve built. Homeowner’s policies do not cover flooding.
  • Keep important documents in a waterproof container. Create password-protected digital copies.
  • Protect your property. Move valuables to higher levels. Declutter drains and gutters. Install check valves. Consider a sump pump with a battery.

For more information on how to stay safe when a flood threatens, visit www.ready.gov/floods.

Hurricane Season Is Here

7/25/2018 (Permalink)

It may seem early, but hurricane season is currently underway. For the Atlantic, the season begins June 1st and runs through November 30th. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season began in mid-May and will continue through November 30th as well. Hurricanes can be life-threatening as well as cause serious property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds, and tornadoes. While the primary threat is in the coastal areas, many inland areas can also be affected by these hazards, as well as by secondary events such as power outages as a result of the high winds and landslides due to rainfall.

Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Plan an evacuation route and your emergency plan, take inventory of your property, and take steps to protect your home or business. For more information and preparation tips, visit the Ready campaign website at www.ready.gov/hurricanes.

2018 Hurricane Season

5/25/2018 (Permalink)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is predicting a near or above normal 2018 Atlantic hurricane season. They’re predicting anywhere from 10-16 named storms. In the range of 5-9 becoming hurricanes and out of those 1-4 becoming major hurricanes. The NOAA states that the possibility of a weak El Nino developing and near-average sea surface temperatures across the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea are two of the factors that are driving this outlook.

With all of the sophisticated technology, next-generation models and satellite data; this helps decision makers and the general public the ability to take action before, during and after hurricanes. After the 2017 Hurricane season, specifically Hurricane Harvey, Southeast Texas can use this information to be better prepared for the upcoming 2018 season.

Source: www.noaa.gov

Being Prepared

5/10/2018 (Permalink)

April showers bring May flowers! May is always a very busy month as school is coming to an end and summer is just around the corner. And before we know it we will be back to Hurricane Season!

The same is true for preparedness planning in May. The following preparedness events take place this month and offer a great chance to educate yourself!

  • Wildfire Community Preparedness Day (May 5, 2018)
  • National Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 6-12, 2018)
  • National Dam Safety Awareness Day (May 31, 2018)
  • National Building Safety Month

May also brings two weeks to show appreciation for our first responders.

  • National Police Week (May 13-19, 2018)
  • National Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week (May 20-26, 2018)

Be sure to visit ready.gov for more information and resources to be prepared!

FEMA App

4/4/2018 (Permalink)

Be prepared to weather the storm with the FEMA App. This app allows you to get National Weather Service alerts for up to five locations to keep you informed on-the-go. It also has information on what to do before, during, and after different disasters. In the midst of an emergency, the app can give you directions to open shelters nearby, help you locate someone to talk to at a Disaster Recovery Center, and let you share images of damage and recovery efforts to help first responders and emergency managers.

This app is available to download for free for iOS and Android at the Apple Store and on Google Play.

Have other questions on how to prepare for a storm? Contact SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton (409) 729-2800 on how to plan for an emergency!

Source: www.fema.gov/mobile-app

SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team

3/12/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team SERVPRO Disaster Recovery Team stationed at our office during Hurricane Harvey.

Did you know that SERVPRO has a specialized storm team and large loss response network to provide the resources to your property when others can’t? In the event of a disaster, SERVPRO professionals have the resources to relocate crews with equipment to take care of all of our customer’s needs. SERVPRO strategically places mobilization teams across the country to travel when needed to support in recovery after large storm events such as hurricanes. Our job as water damage restoration professionals is to limit the amount of business interruption. We understand that fast mitigation is key to getting your business back up and running. SERVPRO provides the resources in the event of a large storm event to make sure that the right equipment, procedures and training are in place to ensure that the structure is dry the first time and saves you time and money.

Do you have questions about how SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton can help you prepare for a disaster? Contact us today at (409) 729-2800!

SERVPRO ERP Advantage

3/1/2018 (Permalink)

Do you own a business or businesses? In Southeast Texas, we know we can’t prevent disasters from happening, but we can prepare for them. What if I told you SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton could help provide peace of mind to your businesses in the event of a disaster? With an Emergency Ready Profile (ERP), you can prepare your business and minimize work interruption by creating an immediate plan of action in the event of a disaster. An ERP is at no cost to you and/or your business. It places all important information in a smart phone app at the palm of your hand. It also provides shut-off valve locations, priority areas and priority contact information—creating a quick reference of what to do, how to do it and who to contact in the event of a disaster. Finally, it establishes SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton as your local disaster mitigation and restoration provider.

Contact us today (409) 729-2800 for your no cost assessment of you facility preparing you for the next disaster!

Severe Weather Safety

2/20/2018 (Permalink)

Severe weather can happen at any time, anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms:

  • 10,000 severe thunderstorms
  • 5,000 floods or flash floods
  • 1,300 tornadoes
  • 2 land falling deadly hurricanes

Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action, and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know Your Risk. The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms, and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action. Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your home and business. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example. Once you have taken action to prepare for a severe weather, share your story with co-workers, family, and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

Hurricane Harvey

2/14/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Hurricane Harvey Our flooded office due to Hurricane Harvey.

Here we are 6 months after the biggest storm event our community has endured in the many years. Hurricane Harvey affected our SERVPRO office in many ways. Our office flooded alongside with the rest of Southeast Texas. Our SERVPRO team strived to service as many of the affected community members as possible. With the help of our SERVPRO Storm Team, we were able to touch so many of those affected during this disastrous event. It has been truly amazing to see Southeast Texas come together; as many experienced loss on such a significant scale. Southeast Texas has done a wonderful job restoring the community and help place a sense of normalcy for our area. Our SERVPRO family is blessed to be a part of such a strong and united community!

Ready for whatever happens, SERVPRO storm team

10/4/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage Ready for whatever happens, SERVPRO storm team SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton helping with the clean up in Elizabethtown, New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy.

Ready For Whatever Happens

SERVPRO Storm

When a storm or disaster strikes, SERVPRO’s Disaster Recovery Team is poised and “Ready for whatever happens.” With a network of more than 1,700 Franchises, the SERVPRO System strives to be faster to any size disaster.  Strategically located throughout the United States, SERVPRO’s Disaster Recovery Team, is trained and equipped to handle the largest storms and highest flood waters.  Providing experience, manpower, equipment and other resources, the Disaster Recovery Team assists your local SERVPRO Franchise Professionals.  SERVPRO’s Disaster Recovery Team has responded to hundreds of disaster events.  In the aftermath of a disaster, there is only one objective, to help you make it “Like it never even happened.”

  • 2016 Houston, TX Flooding- In April, a nearly stationary mesoscale convective system developed over Houston resulting in widespread rainfall rates of 2-4 inches per hour. This was a historic flooding event for Harris County which saw a total of nearly 18 inches per hour. The Storm Team dispatched 81 crews to over 360 jobs mitigation over $3 million in damages.
  • 2015 Siberian Express: Record sub-zero temperatures caused major problems for a large portion of the country stretching from Florida to Maine. The Midwest also experienced record breaking low temperature3s resulting in frozen pipes and ice dams causing major problems for residents. The Strom Team dispatched a total of 257 crews from 108 Franchises to assist local SERVPRO Franchises completing nearly 2000 jobs.
  • 2014 Mid-Atlantic Flooding: Rainfall rates up to 2 inches per hour caused major flash flooding stretching from Northeast Ohio all the way up to Portland, Maine. Eastern Michigan and Baltimore, Maryland were also impacted creating over 1381 jobs for the Strom team to produce. A total of 82 SERVPRO Franchises and 173 crews mitigated over $4.3 million in damages while assisting the local Franchises.
  • 2014 Polar Vortex: Record low temperatures caused by a break in the North Pole’s polar vortex resulted in an unprecedented freezing event, spanning from east of the Rocky Mountains to as far south as Central Florida, effecting all or part of 39 states and 70 % of the SERVPRO Franchise System.
  • 2013 Colorado Floods: Heavy rainfall, with amounts up to 17 inches in some areas, resulted in the widespread flooding in Fort Collins, Boulder and surrounding Colorado mountain communities. The Disaster Recovery Team responded with 109 crews and 48 Franchises to assist the local SERVPRO Franchises in the emergency response.
  • 2012 Hurricane Sandy: Affecting more than 20 states, Sandy left widespread damage and flooding from Florida stretching the entire eastern seaboard to Maine. The Disaster Recovery Team placed nearly 1000 crews in affected areas, representing over 300 SERVPRO Franchises from across the country. Teams traveled from as far as Arizona, California, Oregon and Washington.

New Way to Spell Water Disaster

4/22/2016 (Permalink)

Storm Damage New Way to Spell Water Disaster Commercial flood loss SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton help get back in business.

Whether you live on the coast, near a lake, or riverside, the flood will find you.  And when it does, it can leave you with years' worth of damage, not to mention credit card bills and bankruptcy.

Various news stories of commercial and residential properties drowning in murky waters, or sitting empty a year later look abandoned and still reeking with "remnants of saturated insulation and mold hanging from the beams' as on homeowner described it... will inject fear into anyone's heart.

For that reason, the Federal EMergency Management Agency (FEMA) has published a guide stating which materials are best used in certain situations.

It's interstesting because even safe materials, when combined with unsafe products such as adhesives, become undesirable.  For example, vinyl tile is an acceptable surface but if it's applied over plywood it becomes unacceptable because there's no way for the plywood to dry after a flood.  Even oil-based paint can inhibit drying of a wooden wall.

That's when you call the professionals at SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton to make sure the situation is handled so there are no surprises and no adverse effects on the occupants' health or safety. 

SERVPRO Cleans Up the Mess after a Flood

FEMA says the following are not permitted in flood-prone areas:

  1. Nornal adhesives which are water soluble or not resistant to alkali or acid in water
  2. Materials containing wood or paper products, or other materials that lose structural integrity when exposed to water
  3. Sheet-type floor or wall covering (linoleum, rubber tile, wallpaper) that inhibit drying of the materials they cover
  4. Materials that are 'dimensionally unstable' of instance, a door jamb that swells and does not return to its original size
  5. Materials that retain excessive water after they've been submerged.

We have so much more to loss...

Homeowners tell us there is no greater devastation then seeing the house they've made a home destroyed by a quick moving flood.  The fact that the flood could have been caused by something as innocuous as a leaking pipe behind the washing machine makes the destruction seem even more senseless.

FEMA's classification was based on the fact that a home constructed with the vulnerable materials may harbor mold, other fungi or allergens; that materials may absorb checmicals and continue to exude them even after the house has been thoroughly dried. In addition, water frenders some materials more susceptible to rot.  These are just a few of the many after effects of a flood.

SERVPRO should be on speed dial

The SERVPRO of Orange/Nederland/Lumberton team has been trained to responed, swifly, and knowledgably.  There's a resaon why FEMA and the EPA recommend consulting with professionals in the wake of water damage.

Back in teh day (as they say), houses were made of straw, stone, or brick.  If they weren't blown down or burned up, they were abandoned by the time the children were grown.  Today, the American home is our castle.  It reflects our lives, interests, loves, travels, hopes, memories...and the most important people we share it with.

Let's hope you are not a victim of a home destroying event.  But if it happens, don't panic.  Keep our number handy: 409-729-2800.  We're here 24/7 to answer the call...and make your loss like "It Never Even Happened."